Tunning

Investigating Ransomware Infections with QRadar

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Ransomware is the nightmare of most of system administrators and security officers. It’s an emerging threat and the trend unfortunately is upward: more and more companies are being hit by ransomware, from small shops to large corporations.

In a previous post we discussed on how to use your QRadar to detect ongoing ransomware infections. In this post we will be discussing how to investigate ransomware attacks using your SIEM.

You may be wondering, “why bothering if it’s too late?”. It is extremely important to understand the vectors exploited and the timeline of the attack so we can avoid future infections and even stop current ransomware attacks.

Here’s a list of items to check using your QRadar:

  • Anti Virus logs: That seems the most obvious thing to check. We can try to identify if the antivirus detected the threat and which was the first computer affected (the “entry point”). We can also check if the users infected had turned their antivirus off or if the ransomware was not even detected by the antivirus (a potential zero-day).
  • Network Traffic: The majority of the ransomware strains communicate to a Command & Control server for two main reasons: synchronize the malware data, and in some cases, exfiltrate sensitive data. You can use your QRadar to find if your machines are connecting to a new external IP. For example, if you had all your HR laptops infected, and in the same period you observe all the laptops connecting to a new specific IP, that’s most likely the command and control server. You can blacklist this IP in your firewalls and create custom rules on QRadar to alert in case new machines trying to connect to this IP.
  • Windows Logs: The windows logs can provide a lot of useful information
    • Network Connection Logs: You can try to identify the command and control server by the windows network logs. Those logs can also indicate an anomalous number of connections in a port. For example, the latest ransomware threats were exploiting a vulnerability in the SMB protocol, so if you see an unusual number of connections on port 139 or 445, that may indicate a ransomware proliferating into your network. If that’s the case, you can disable the vulnerable service or block the connections on the windows firewall.
    • File Modification Logs: As discussed in this previous post an ongoing ransomware infection generates a lot of “file update” logs. If you detect an anomalous number of file update logs, that may indicate a ransomware threat.
    • USB Logs: Most of the ransomware attacks spread through emails and webpages, but they can also be delivered through infected USB sticks. If you know the approximate time of the infection, you can check for USB logs, looking for inserted devices. If the source is a USB stick, contact the user and make sure other people do not do the same.
  • Email Logs: Most of the ransomware strains use an email phishing campaign as entry point in a company. Check your email logs (example: Microsoft Exchange logs) for suspicious attachments sent to internal users. If you find the first person infected, you can find the sender and prevent other people of receiving similar emails and getting infected.
  • HTTP Logs: Ransomware can also be distributed through malicious websites. If you have your HTTP proxy logs, check for unusual downloads or unusual websites. If you find the source of the ransomware it is easy to block the access and avoid that other users get infected.

Having a proper incident investigation will help you to reduce the impact of an ongoing ransomware attack and may help you to prevent future attacks.

How do you investigate your ransomware attacks? Share with us in the comments.

Monitoring Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) cloud solutions with QRadar

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One of the big advantages of having a Software-As-A-Service (SaaS) solution is the fact you don’t need to worry about infrastructure issues, such as patching, network availability, and etc. Also, most of the companies assume that all the security aspects of the solution will be handled by the vendor. Indeed, the vendor is (or should be) responsible for ensuring their system is secure, but it’s important to note that we should still monitor the SaaS solution for hacking attempts, which can be done through QRadar.

Picture this: imagine you have your website on wordpress, you pay wordpress as a service so you don’t need to worry about patching or updates. In theory, the wordpress team also monitors if someone tries to perform an attack against your site (for example, a SQL injection). But let’s say a malicious actor finds out the password of one of your wordpress users and creates a backdoor account for later exploitation. It wouldn’t be flagged by the wordpress security team (since it’s just a new user being created). That’s where QRadar can add value. If you integrate your wordpress with your QRadar solution, you would be able to generate an alert to your system administrator when a user is created or even correlate this event with other events such as pages being modified.

The easiest way to integrate your SaaS with QRadar is through email alerts from your SaaS solution. Let’s take the WordPress example and put it into a step-by-step:

  • Install the WordPress “Security Audit log” plugin
  • Create a mailbox to receive the alerts
  • Create a script that reads your mailbox and saves into a file. For example, you can modify this script to achieve that.
  • Create a custom DSM parser that interprets the file generated by the script above.
  • Create a log source on QRadar that monitors the file created by the script mentioned on step three. Use the custom DSM on this log source.

The implementation may require some time in the first time, but after setting up your first SaaS it will be trivial to set up the second one (since you will already have the mailbox set up and the script that reads the file). The same step by step can be adapted for a number of other SaaS services, such as: Dropbox, Gmail, Office365, Salesforce, AWS Cloudtrail and CloudWatch, etc…

Some of the events that can be interesting for us: New accounts created, change on security settings, login out of business hours, bruteforce attacks, configuration changes, etc.

Monitoring your SaaS solutions will put you one step ahead, ensuring that even applications on the cloud are being monitored and secure. Remember, even the server not being in your datacentre, the data in a SaaS application still yours.

 

Detecting ransomware with QRadar using behavioral analysis

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Ransomware is one of the top trending concerns in any business; hundreds of business are seeing their data being encrypted even with the latest security solutions. As most of anti-virus solutions are signature based, they are not fully capable of detecting the latest ransomware strains. In this post we will be discussing how to configure QRadar to detect ransomware threats in real time by observing events’ behaviour.

Ransomware may seem a complex attack, but most of them are actually quite simple: The malware encrypts files and then shows a ransom message to the user. The objective of the attacker is to encrypt the files as fast as possible to maximize the impact (if the encryption is slow the user may notice and stop the attack before all the files gets encrypted), and that’s how we can detect the threat.

In a simple language, the encryption process consists in: open a file, read a file, write the encrypted file, close the file. If you are monitoring your servers with QRadar, every time a file is updated an event is generated. So if you detect a high volume of “file update” events in a short period of time, it may be a sign of a ransomware infection.

Based on that, to implement an effective ransomware monitoring capability on QRadar all you need to do is:

  • Ensure file audit is enabled on your windows servers: You need to be able to see events such as “File open”, “File Update” and “File Delete”. Before creating any rule, search for those event names to make sure you are getting them. Please note that this can considerably increase your EPS rate, so if you have a large environment and you’re enabling file-access audit consider enabling it in stages and observing your EPS rate.
  • Create an offense rule that detect multiple file updates: A good threshold is 500 file updates in a minute. If you see more than 500 file updates in less than a minute, that’s an indication that there is an automated process updating your files (which may be a sign of ransomware).

If you have any mitigation system (such as IBM BigFix or McAfee EPO), you can even trigger a mitigation action to stop the ransomware. For example with QRadar you can send a “process kill” request to IBM BigFix, which will quickly login into the machine and kill the ransomware process.

It is important to note that QRadar is detecting ransomware through system behaviour. This puts QRadar in advantage if compared to regular signature-based anti-virus solutions, since we will be capable of detecting “zero-day” ransomware, which anti-virus solutions may not have signature for it.

This post is based on a very interesting video series called “QRadar Stopping Ransomware” by Jose Bravo. If you want to see step-by-step of how to configure your SIEM to stop ransomware, you should check out his youtube channel.

Proactively identifying performance issues with the HCF plugin

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In the last post, we talked about the Health Check Framework (HCF) and its benefits. Since I’ve been using the plugin for over a month I was able to collect useful performance information and identify some potential performance issues even before they occur. In this post, you will learn how to proactively monitor your system performance and prevent potential performance issues from happening.

First, you will need to install the Health Check Framework plugin. The installation process is quite straightforward: all you need is to go to your IBM app store on your QRadar environment, search for “Health Check Framework” and install it following the steps on the screen. With the plugin installed, you can start by browsing the plugin interface and extracting a report about your system performance. In this report, you will see a lot of details about your system, such as CPU Usage, Disk Usage, EPS, FPM, heavy reports, current users, etc.

Report generated by the Health Check Framework (HFC) – A holistic view of your environment, note the number of tabs on the report

 

In my case, we are planning to expand the scope of servers monitored by QRadar, so I wanted to understand if we would need any hardware upgrades. For testing purposes, I disabled the log collection of 30 Windows servers that were currently being monitored and I noticed that the RAM memory usage reduced by around 5% (see images below). Obviously, this number will vary according to the server usage, but this test gave me a rough estimation that for each 30 servers my RAM memory usage will increase around 5%. So with the help of the HCF plugin, I was able to identify hardware upgrades to accommodate the monitoring of new servers, avoiding system outages due to lack of resources during the scope expansion.

Before disabling Windows test servers – Memory used ~40GB

 

After disabling the Windows servers – Memory used: ~38GB

 

Even if you’re not planning to expand your scope, you can use historical performance data to proactively identify issues. For example, let’s say, your QRadar monitors a new e-commerce website. The number of logs you get depends on the traffic your website has. With the historical data, you will be able to identify a performance trend: as the e-commerce website becomes more popular, the EPS increases and the CPU/Memory usage also increases. With this data, you will be able to estimate at which point in time you will need a hardware upgrade, avoiding any unexpected system outages due to lack of resources.

Another very interesting data that I found in this report was the “Event Average Payload Size”, which as the name says, tells you the average size of logs received. This can be very useful to identify hard drive requirements when expanding your EPS.

Using the same plugin I was also able to identify heavy reports and rules that were severely impacting the performance of my QRadar environment. After reviewing and fixing the queries of the reports and rules, it was noticed a considerable reduction in the CPU usage.

Chart extracted from the HCF report – Identifying heavy rules

 

Monitoring the performance of your system puts you in a proactive posture in relation to your environment. Being proactive means that you will not be firefighting issues as before, but instead, monitoring and planning upgrades ahead to avoid issues even before they happen.

QRadar Apps: Health Check Framework

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One of the most interesting features introduced on QRadar 7.2.6 is the AppExchange, which allow you to install plugins (or also called, QRadar Apps) within just few clicks. Last week I came across a very interesting app called Health Check Framework (HCF) that allows you to perform health checks on your QRadar platform. What I found interesting is that the plugin brings you information that you would need to spend hours trying to find in the complicated QRadar log files or that you would need to be manually running scripts on the server. The plugin also creates for you real-time dashboards showing information around data compression, index file usage, EPS usage, and others.

dashboard1
QRadar Health Check Framework (HCF) Dashboard

 

The plugin, which can be easily installed through the IBM AppExchange, is developed by a company called Science Soft, you can check their app details in their website, but here’s the main features that caught my attention:

 

  • HCF provides a 360-degree view of all essential characteristics of QRadar operation. It indicates deviations, which allows security officers to take urgent steps to fix them.
  • QRadar health check can be both scheduled and started manually on demand, and its results are provided as a report.
  • HCF assesses QRadar’s state with 60+ operational metrics that are configured into 25 health markers showing either ‘OK’ or ‘Failed’ and reported in an email to HCF subscribers.
  • The reports describe how well the security system components are connected to QRadar and if there are security events that are not classified.
  • Ability to create a system-health baseline using the called “health markers”, which are are like a snapshot of QRadar, allowing you to compare the health status over a period of time.
  • ‘Failed’ markers are followed by recommendations on further actions.

 

dashboard2
Sample of the analytics dashboard on QRadar Health Check Framework

 

The HCF app has been helping me to troubleshoot performance issues and helped me to proactively identify some issues (for example, that my server was using almost all of its RAM memory in a constant trend). The app also reduced the amount of time I spend analyzing the QRadar log files, so it may be useful for you to keep control of your SIEM environment and increase the ROI of your SIEM investment.

If you would like to know more about this plugin, check out the developer’s website or the IBM QRadar AppExchange! If you have used this app, tell us on the comments your experience!

Third party check engine under the right-click menu

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Today we’d like to share how you can easily add an extra plugin to your QRadar. This can be useful when you want to do deep investigations in a easy way, just using the right-click function. As an example, let’s add IPVOID (http://www.ipvoid.com/) to check source/destination IPs which can be found in a QRadar event.

 

In order to achieve it, follow below steps:

1. Open a SSH session to your QRadar main console.

2. Make a copy of the ip_context_menu.xml template to the QRadar config folder:
[root@my_radar]# cp /opt/qradar/conf/templates/ip_context_menu.xml /opt/qradar/conf/

3. Add your “new third party search engine” by editing the ip_context_menu.xml file:
[root@my_radar]# vim /opt/qradar/conf/ip_context_menu.xml

3. Add the following line in the ip_context_menu.xml file. You can change the parameters according with your plugin:
<contextMenu>
<menuEntry name=”IPVOID Check” url=”http://www.ipvoid.com/scan/%IP%/&#8221; />
</contextMenu>

4. Restart the tomcat service
[root@my_radar]#service tomcat restart

5. Done! Now you can use your plugin. It will appear under the right click, More Options->Plugins->IPVOID Check.

 

Changing firewall rules

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By the original QRadar configuration, all the appliances comes with a pre-configured firewall rules in the OS. For testing purposes we can simple deactivate the firewall using the command “service iptables stop” (to stop the firewall) and “service iptables start” (to turn it back). But sometimes we need to update the firewall configuration aiming permanent changes.

In order to change firewall rules on your appliance you need to follow the below steps:

  • Connect through SSH to the appliance that you want to make modifications;
  • Login using ‘root’ account;
  • Edit one of the following files:
    • /opt/qradar/conf/iptables.pre
    • /opt/qradar/conf/iptables.post
    • /opt/qradar/conf/iptables-nat.post
  • Add your firewall rules in the file, for example:
    • -A INPUT -i eth0 -s x.x.x.x -j ACCEPT
  • Save the file with the ‘ :wq ‘;
  • Run /opt/qradar/bin/iptables_update.pl so your changes take effect;

With those steps your firewall configuration is now changed and will persist even in rebooting cases.