Integrations

Installing a Device Adapter on the QRadar Risk Manager

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Today I was trying to install device adapters into the new QRadar Risk Manager 7.2. After sometime struggling (due the “incomplete” IBM documentation) I decided to create this post to help you guys to configure a new adapter in the Risk Manager. First things first, for those who don’t know, the QRadar Risk Manager need an adapter for each kind of device that you want to monitor the configuration. It means for example, if you have few Checkpoint Firewalls and few Cisco routers that you want to monitor the configuration, you will need to install the Checkpoint adapter and the Cisco adapter.

So, here’s the step by step to configure the adapters:

[All the files mentioned in this post can be found in this link, or at www.ibm.com/support/fixcentral ]

 

– Install the dependencies: (Only necessary in the first time configuration)

  • Download the rpm files: “ziptie-server” and “adapters-common” in your machine;
  • Connect to the Risk Manager server using SSH.
  • Create a new folder: /tmp/adapters
  • Copy the downloaded files from your computer into the new folder
  • Execute:  rpm -Uvh ziptie_filename.rpm   (use the ziptie file that you just transferred)
  • Execute:  rpm -Uvh adapterscommon_filename.rpm    (use the adapterscommon file that you just transferred)
  • Execute: service ziptie-server restart

 

– Install the adapter: (Repeat it for all the necessary adapters)

  • Download the rpm files for your adapter, example: cisco_adapter.rpm into your machine;
  • Connect to the Risk Manager server using SSH;
  • Copy the downloaded files from your machine to the folder /tmp/adapters ;
  • Execute:  rpm -Uvh cisco_adapter.rpm   (Change the filename for the adapter downloaded)
  • Execute: service ziptie-server restart

 

After those steps your adapter will be ready for use.

If you want, you can check the official IBM documentation in this link, but I found some missing steps on it.

Windows Desktops Log Collection – Methods Comparison

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Hi folks! I’m glad of receiving good feedback from you guys! The topic of this post was one recent request from our followers, asking about what the best way to send windows logs to QRadar is. As you can imagine, there’s no best solution, it depends on what kind of environment we have. So to reply this question as simple and short as possible, I created the following table comparing some log collection methods.

WindowsLogsComparison

To get more information about the Snare Agent, you can check out the vendor website. To get more information about the another two collection methods, you can check out our post about configuring log sources and the official documentation in this another post.

Do you have any question or suggestion? Let us know in the comments!

Configuring the Log Sources

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When implementing a large QRadar environment we can face several types of log sources across the network. QRadar support more than one hundred type of devices out-of-the-box and can integrate with any another log source using customized parsers. The log source parsers are known in QRadar as Device Support Modules (DSMs).

A personal recommendation to integrate log sources with QRadar is: always use syslog when it is possible. Why? Basically syslog is the standard log protocol for many devices, and QRadar can easily collect, identify and receive logs using this protocol. The syslog typically uses UDP connections, so make the log collection more fast and with almost zero latency. Make sure that all the firewalls of your environment allow traffic to QRadar in the port 514 (default syslog port).

IBM provide a good documentation explaining thorougly how to configure each type of device to send logs to QRadar. You can find the DSM configuration guide in the following link:

QRadar_721_DSMConfigurationGuide

Do you have another tips to configure your devices? Share with us!